Thursday, July 13, 2017

Check out our latest story: 'One unique sucker'

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Check out our latest story!

One unique sucker

Cui ui sucjer fish

The cui ui (pronounced "KWEE-wee") is a lake suckerfish species and living remnant from the last ice age that occurs only in
Pyramid Lake in northern Nevada. The fish is highly revered by the Paiute people and is also carefully protected by the staff
of the Lahontan National Fish Hatchery Complex for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Credit: Dan Hottle//USFWS

 


Cui ui once roamed throughout nearly 8,500 square miles of Lake Lahontan, North America's largest body of water that stretched across much of Nevada more than 10,000 years ago


 

By Dan Hottle
July 12, 2017

The saga of the endangered cui ui is every bit as unique as the sucker itself.

Pronounced "KWEE-wee," this lake suckerfish species is a living prehistoric artifact of the last ice age, curiously studied by biologists and highly revered by the Paiute people. It is also carefully protected by the staff of the Lahontan National Fish Hatchery Complex for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

For starters, this fish is not listed as endangered because there's too few of them left alive, but rather because of where it lives – in a magnificent terminal desert lake that has struggled for survival for eons.

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